2018 Redspot Survey

The roads Victorians hate

The 2018 Redspot Survey identified the 10 most congested roads using data that recorded traffic and speeds across the State. Victorians were then invited to vote on these locations or report their own.  Over 18,000 votes and nominations were collected over the five-week survey period.

2018 Results Countdown

Of the 10 sites identified by RACV, Alexandra Parade in Clifton Hill took the title as Victoria's top Redspot, with 22% of voters declaring it to be the worst. This was followed by Thompsons Road, Skye, with 16% of the votes.  Equal third were  Rosanna Road, Heidelberg, and Kings Way, Southbank. Each received 14% of the votes.​

Victoria is seeing red on the roads

The 2018 RACV Redspots are symptoms of the unprecedented growth that Melbourne is experiencing. They reflect pain points on our road network caused by rapidly growing suburbs, our inner city employment boom, and historical gaps in road and public transport networks. RACV wants Melbourne to be a world-class connected city.  To achieve this we need to have an integrated transport system across our freeways, highways, railways and tram lines. Network gaps in our outer suburbs must also be addressed for our city to function.

2018 Redspot Survey Results

1. Alexandra Parade, Clifton Hill - Charlotte Street to Wellington Street

Alexandra Parade

Alexandra Parade is one of Melbourne's hardest working arterial roads, transferring traffic between the Eastern Freeway and CityLink. Many eastern-suburbs motorists use this route to get to Melbourne Airport and often find themselves stuck in long queues of traffic.  With over 64,000 vehicles per day crawling through this location at average speeds as low as 20 km/h in the peak hours, it’s no wonder this has been rated by Victorians as their most disliked congestion spot in Victoria.​

In the same corridor, the road link comprising Racecourse Road, Elliott Avenue and Macarthur Road from CityLink to Royal Parade, Parkville, was also nominated in the survey.

What RACV wants:

  • Commitments from the major political parties to investigate improving this east-west travel corridor through Melbourne's inner north.
  • Solutions must be found to have a sound business-case before a commitment to construction.

Back to top

2. Thompsons Road, Skye - Taylors Road to Western Port Highway

Thompson's Road, Skye

Traffic travelling on Thompsons Road comes to a standstill at the roundabout, with queues banking back for kilometres. Works are currently underway as part of a $207 million upgrade. The roundabout will be replaced with traffic lights, which is intended to reduce congestion and improve travel times. While these works will be welcomed by the drivers of the 26,000 vehicles that use Thompsons Road every day, an interchange will probably be needed as well as further development of east-west road links across the Casey growth area.

What RACV wants:

  • Planning for an interchange and further funding to improve east-west connections in the Cranbourne West region of the City of Casey.  For specific projects that would support and ease pressure on Thompsons Road, refer to RACV’s blueprint to ease congestion in outer Melbourne at www.racv.com.au/growingpains.

Back to top

3. Rosanna Road, Heidelberg - Darebin Street to Burgundy Street

Rosanna Road, Heidelberg

This location along the corridor of the missing north east freeway link in the Metropolitan Ring Road has long been rated as a Redspot.  Our congestion data confirms that it continues to cause delays as cars and trucks filter through suburbs such as Bulleen, Heidelberg and Rosanna each day to make their way between the end of the Metropolitan Ring Road in Greensborough and the Eastern Freeway. The State budget in 2018/19 allocated $3.1 million to reduce congestion and improve safety, which will only make a small dent in the problem before the North East Link project is completed.

What RACV wants:

  • Complete the North East Link between the Metropolitan Ring Road at Greensborough and the Eastern Freeway.
  • Works to address safety and congestion along Rosanna Road in the interim, because this narrow arterial road will continue to be a major truck and commuter route until the North East Link opens.

Back to top

Equal 3rd: Kings Way, Southbank - York Street to West Gate Freeway

Kings Way Southbank

Kings Way is one of Melbourne's long-term inner-city traffic routes. Each day it is used by around 100,000 cars and trucks. It connects the bayside and south-eastern suburbs via Dandenong Road and St Kilda Road to the Melbourne CBD and the West Gate Freeway (M1).  In peak hour, traffic crawls through this section of road at an average of 18km/h, well below the posted speed limit.

The Melbourne Metro project works are having a major impact on  Kings Way.  The road is one of the key routes in the vicinity of the new Anzac Station so it must take extra traffic that is being diverted away from construction activities along St Kilda Road.  Works to improve traffic capacity along Kings Way have been underway since 2017, but the Redspot Survey shows that more needs to be done during the lengthy Metro construction phase.​

In the longer term, Metro Tunnel will likely lead to a reconfiguration of the tram network in inner Melbourne, with more trams along Kings Way and the parallel Clarendon/Spencer Street route.

What RACV wants:

  • The State Government to commit to additional improvements along Kings Way, Canterbury Road and other parallel roads to better manage increased traffic during Metro Tunnel construction.  Options that have been put forward include better camera surveillance, turn bans, lane management along Queens Road and investigating what can be done to reduce delays at the intersection of King Street and Flinders Street.​
  • Transport for Victoria to investigate changes to the tram network at completion of the Melbourne Metro project to provide more frequent public transport options for access to the western end of the Melbourne CBD, for people living and working in South Melbourne, and connecting to Melbourne Metro at Anzac Station.​

Back to top

5. Western Ring Road, Ardeer - Sunshine Avenue to Western Highway

Alexandra Parade

Carrying well over 100,000 vehicles per day, the Western Ring Road is one of Melbourne's busiest routes. Traffic growth across Melbourne, especially in the north and west, has created sections of major congestion where traffic moves at a crawl.  ​

Congestion between Sunshine Avenue and the Western Highway arises from the adjacent narrow section of freeway between Sunshine Avenue and Keilor Park Drive, including the EJ Whitten Bridge over the Maribyrnong River. Work to widen this section of freeway is currently underway, and is due for completion in late 2018. Further widening works will occur between the Princes Highway and Western Highway in future years. Relief should come with the progressive opening of the widened sections of freeway.

What RACV wants:

  • Completion of the upgrades of the M80 Western Ring Road.

Back to top

6. Burke Road, Balwyn - Eastern Freeway to The Boulevard

Alexandra Parade

Burke Road in Melbourne's east provides one of the few crossings over the Yarra River.  Where it narrows from four lanes to two lanes, it creates a frustrating pinch point with long queues of cars and buses forming, especially for those heading north.​

Congestion in this area is likely to be alleviated by the construction of the North-East Link, which will provide an alternative route from the Eastern Freeway to the north.

What RACV wants:

  • Completion of the North East Link.

Back to top

7. High Street, Epping - Park Street to O'Herns Road

High Street Epping

The single lane roundabout at High Street and O’Herns Road has long struggled to cope with increasing traffic in Melbourne's growing north. The good news is that an $81 million upgrade has started (services are currently being relocated), but for now it ranks as one of Melbourne's most congested spots. 

Stage 1 of the upgrade includes replacing the roundabout with traffic lights, adding slip lanes and right turn lanes and providing on-road bike lanes. Stage 2 will see O’Herns Road duplicated between the Hume Freeway and Redding Rise (west of this roundabout) and access provided to the Hume Freeway.  Also in planning is the addition of extra traffic lanes along Epping Road.

High Street and Epping Road form the only north-south arterial road corridor for the fast growing suburbs at Epping North and north to Wollert.  A once-promised railway/transit corridor never eventuated. The Redspot Survey shows that despite the big investment in rail to Mernda, even more needs to be done across the northern growth region to create more travel options.

What RACV wants:

  • Funding allocated for continued improvements to transport connections in Melbourne’s north.  For specific projects that would support and ease pressure on High Street/Epping Road, refer to RACV’s blueprint to ease congestion in outer Melbourne at www.racv.com.au/growingpains.

Back to top

Equal 7th: Malvern Road, Toorak - Williams Road to Westbourne Street

Alexandra Parade

This Redspot is located along the busy Malvern Road shopping strip where it intersects with Williams Road.  Like many traditional shopping strips that developed along arterial roads in inner Melbourne, Malvern Road struggles with high levels of traffic competing with parking, pedestrians, public transport and bike riders for limited road space.  This is an arterial road managed by VicRoads but on-road parking is controlled by the City of Stonnington.

What RACV wants:

  • VicRoads and local Councils to ensure that arterial road shopping strips balance the needs of residents and shoppers, including parking demands and loading needs, with the needs of commuters moving through the strip in cars, public transport and bikes.

Back to top

9. Upper Heidelberg Road, Ivanhoe - Kenilworth Parade to Waterdale Road

Upper Heidelberg Road, Ivanhoe

This location through the vibrant and popular Ivanhoe shopping strip is a known bottleneck where local traffic wrestles for space with cars, trucks and buses commuting to/from Melbourne's north-eastern suburbs.  It is an arterial road managed by VicRoads but on-road parking is controlled by the City of Banyule.

What RACV wants:

  • VicRoads and local Councils to ensure that arterial road shopping strips balance the needs of residents and shoppers, including parking demands and loading needs, with the needs of commuters moving through the strip in cars, public transport and bikes.

Back to top

10. Barkly Street, Footscray - Donald Street to Droop Street

Barkly Street Footscray

Barkly Street is a local street managed by the City of Maribyrnong, which seeks to encourage walking, cycling and public transport over motorised vehicles through the shopping strip.

What RACV wants:

  • The State Government and VicRoads to improve the operation of the arterial roads around the Footscray shopping precinct.

Back to top

What RACV wants

RACV wants Melbourne to be a world-class connected city.  To achieve this, Melbourne’s transport system must work as a network of modes.  Our major transport spines - our freeways, highways, railway and tram lines - must become better integrated. Busways and cycleways are needed. Network gaps in our outer suburbs must be filled and in our neighbourhood areas, streets through activity centres must be designed for people and slow movement. 

Alexandra Parade, Clifton Hill

  1. Commitments from the major political parties to investigate improving this east-west travel corridor through Melbourne's inner north.  
  2. Solutions must be found to have a sound business-case before a commitment to construction.

Thompsons Road, Skye

  1. Planning for an interchange and further funding to improve east-west connections in the Cranbourne West region of the City of Casey.  For specific projects that would support and ease pressure on Thompsons Road, refer to RACV’s blueprint to ease congestion in outer Melbourne at www.racv.com.au/growingpains.

Rosanna Road, Heidelberg

  1. Complete the North East Link between the Metropolitan Ring Road at Greensborough and the Eastern Freeway.
  2. Works to address safety and congestion along Rosanna Road in the interim, because this narrow arterial road corridor will continue to be a major truck and commuter route until the North East Link opens.

Kings Way, Southbank

  1. The State Government to commit to additional improvements along Kings Way, Canterbury Road and other parallel roads to better manage increased traffic during Metro Tunnel construction.  Options that have been put forward include better camera surveillance, turn bans, lane management along Queens Road and investigating what can be done to reduce delays at the intersection of King Street and Flinders Street.
  2. Transport for Victoria to investigate changes to the tram network at completion of the Melbourne Metro project to provide more frequent public transport options for access to the western end of the Melbourne CBD, for people living and working in South Melbourne, and connecting to Melbourne Metro at Anzac Station.

Malvern Road, Toorak

  1. VicRoads and local Councils to ensure that arterial road shopping strips balance the needs of residents and shoppers, including parking demands and loading needs, with the needs of commuters moving through the strip in cars, public transport and bikes.

High Street, Epping

  1. Funding allocated for continued improvements to transport connections in Melbourne’s north.  For specific projects that would support and ease pressure on High Street/Epping Road, refer to RACV’s blueprint to ease congestion in outer Melbourne at www.racv.com.au/growingpains

Upper Heidelberg Road, Ivanhoe

  1. VicRoads and local Councils to ensure that arterial road shopping strips balance the needs of residents and shoppers, including parking demands and loading needs, with the needs of commuters moving through the strip in cars, public transport and bikes. 

Barkly Street, Footscray

  1. The State Government and VicRoads to improve the operation of the arterial roads around the Footscray shopping precinct.

The Worst Local Redspots

We also asked those that completed the Redspot Survey to nominate their own congested location. We have analysed this data, and the results will be reported in local Leader Community News.

More Information